What is the best way to write your Level 1, 2, & 3 competencies for your RICS APC Journey

Understanding the Levels:

Unfortunately, most the candidates I meet do not understand the competency levels and will fail their RICS APC Final Assessment:

Level 1 – This is all about LEARNING.  Do not try and define the competency or regurgitate the APC Pathway guide text, as so many candidates seem to do!  Remember you are trying to demonstrate to the assessors that you have reviewed the requirements in the APC Pathway guide level1with your supervisor and counsellor, and have researched, undertaken and achieved the required learning.   Also, remember not to talk about your project experience examples at this level, unless you wish to refer to the learning you have reinforced through your experience.

level2Level 2 – This is all about DOING.  This needs to be a focused description of the depth and breadth of your experience and one or two (if you can fit it into the word count) examples of your experience relevant to this competency.

level3Level 3 – This is all about ADVISING.  This needs to be a description of the depth and breadth of your experience and specifically where you have been advising clients, colleagues and anyone else of relevance.  Remember, the ability to advise effectively comes from having had a large amount of varied experience, relevant to your declared competencies. Continue reading

What to do and how to get started on your RICS APC 11 Top Tips

Top Tips for starting  APC

1 Become a member of RICS

Before you are eligible to start your APC, you can sign
up for free Student Membership of RICS and receive a
membership number which gives you instant access to
the RICS website which contains a wealth of knowledge
and other membership services. When you start the APC
your status will change to ‘Trainee Surveyor’.

2 Understand the APC process

Get the RICS APC Guides from http://www.rics.org. Make
sure that you have read and fully understand them as
about a quarter of the candidates I have assessed have in
part been referred because they don’t properly understand
the APC process. You should be reading them at least
once every 3 to 4 months. Candidates from outside the UK
also need to check the differences in the APC for their
world region, see the RICS web site for details.

Continue reading

Remember I SPY? DeLever APC I-SPY

Ever wondered what questions you miQuestion Dice DeLever Harvey Taitght be asked at the RICS APC Final Assessment?


 I am always being asked, by candidates, for a list of Assessment questions?!
BUT there is NO SUCH list, of any use, as assessor questions are focussed on your submission documents!

 From my experience, candidates can be asked anything from around 80 to 100 questions in the interview hour!  

How would you like to get a step ahead in your preparation for your assessment interview?

 DeLever has provided you with this fantastic solution!  RICS APC Harvey Tait

 We are delighted to introduce our APC i-Spy service where our Expert APC Coaches (all active assessors) will review your Final Assessment Submission documents and write you a list of questions they would identify, from their assessing experience, and based upon your actual, real, unique APC submission documentation.

How our DeLever APC i-Spy service works?

  • NOTE: Assessors need at least 2 weeks notice to deliver this service.

If you want your feedback report prior to your APC Final Assessment please act in good time. Shorter timescales may be possible but subject to availability.
Contact
jon@delever.com to discuss.

Go to or click the link http://www.delever.co.uk/apcispy

Construction Enquirer August 2016 Construction Rankings

At DeLever Ltd being a APC Training company involved in training Candidates to become Charter Surveyors. Our mind is trained to love rankings and ordered lists.

Being a reader of the Construction Enquirer we follow their ranking on projects, clients and news.
The latest figures for August 2016 have just been released.

August 2016 figuresThe win helped Bouygues breakaway with close contender BAM from the chasing pack in the rankings for work won over the rolling 12 months.

Both firms are now nearly £500m worth of work ahead of third placed Morgan Sindall, which has been steadily working up the league.

Among the other big wins during the month, McLaren picked up a £155m distribution centre project for Roxhill & the London Distribution Park.

Skanska sealed a £65m job at Great Ormond Street after replacing Bouygues and Galliford Try has a £175m regeneration project for Genesis HA & QPR at Old Oak Common.

Laing O’Rourke soared to the top of the August contracts league after signing off the construction deal for developer Henderson’s £850m St James Quarter project in Edinburgh.

The huge scheme catapulted Laing O’Rourke ahead of second placed Bouygues, which bagged eight projects totalling nearly £500m.

According to information specialist Glenigan, the French contractor won £236m worth of work on the extension of the Midland Metro extension, courtesy of ownership of Colas Rail.

Click for full 100 contractors league

Click for full 100 clients league


DeLever new APC EYE October 16 Edition is out this week to read or download a copy click on the image .

october-apc-eye

This weeks Guest Blog. A Life experience – Graduate to Surveyor

This week’s Guest blog come from  Sean Hughes BSc Hons  Maintenance Officer at The Richmond Fellowship Scotland.


University to working life,

That’s a daunting process: a long hard process applying for jobs and a nerve-wracking time getting knock back after knock back.

With every interview, there seemed to be more competition and with every unsuccessful application, the pressure began to build.  At times, I thought I would never get my first job.

Eventually, I was hired by a residential surveying firm. It lasted a day.  I knew straight away that I had entered the wrong discipline and that to continue would be a mistake.

Yes, it had taken me forever just to get this far, but I knew I had to be honest with myself, and with my employer, who was very supportive of my decision.  After all, another graduate would slide in and take my place.

Finally – finally – I got my first role as a building surveyor; a diverse and ever-changing role that always keeps me on my toes.

One minute you can be researching construction technologies and the next you could be sent to inspect a storm damaged property; however, it’s this diversity that keeps building surveying interesting.  I can speak for myself and say I enjoy the parts in surveying when you’re squeezing through a loft hatch to inspect a leaky roof; that’s what it’s all about.

My university lecturer was a true believer in two types of surveyor: a shirt and tie surveyor and a boiler suit surveyor, and I can truly say I’m a boiler suit surveyor.  It wasn’t until a few months into my new job I actually realised what he meant; a boiler suit surveyor is a surveyor who doesn’t mind getting under floors, in roof spaces and getting himself dirty to find the source of a problem.

That’s me. And finally, I’m happy.

Sean Hughes