Final Assessment and Competency Revision Workshop

#surveyor #RICSAPC #RICS 

Helps you get everything right for APC submission

Intensive one-day workshop

The workshop clearly explains and helps you to understand what the assessors will expect you to do, deliver and know for your final assessment interview.  

Lunch and refreshments are included as well as a bacon butty (or alternative) on arrival.

For More info Click here for a PDF

Benefits of attending the workshop

  • Understand what the assessors are expecting you to know and have done for each of your technical competencies

  • Understand how the mandatory competencies will be assessed

  • Understand how best to prepare for the final assessment

  • Understand how the final assessment will be structured and what to expect

  • Gain an appreciation of the Rules of Conduct and Professional Ethics and how they will be assessed

  • Experience how the assessors will ask competency, knowledge, experience, current affairs and rules of conduct and ethics questions

Benefits.jpg

DATES

7th Feb 16 – Final Assessment and Comp Revision Workshop, Land and Property East Midlands Airport, 8am – 7pm

12th Mar 16 – Final Assessment and Comp Revision Workshop, QS and Construction East Midlands Airport, 8am – 7pm

13th Mar 16 – Final Assessment and Comp Revision Workshop, BINF, BS, 8am – 7pm

Tip of the Week – Interesting building constructions

Its not quite a tip of week, but I found it really interesting how they built the new Hong Kong Airport Terminal and mass of bridges to feed trains and traffic. New building techniques. images
It was such a massive project, how on earth could a QS price it?

Do not send in an answer I’ll ask Jon Lever, he’ll know.
Have a great weekend and watch out for the Now and Next, showing all DeLever events.
Its also available here : http://www.delever.com/comingsoon/DeLeverEvents.pdf

Kind regards

Harvey Tait
DeLever Digital Marketing

 

Getting the right balance of experience – by Jon Lever FRICS

Getting the right balance of experience

As the APC is based on your competency experience it is hard to know whether you are on track if your diary and log book are not up to date. It is a good idea to write up your diary and log book  weekly, including a balncedetailed description regarding your experience.  We suggest writing a sentence or two for each diary entry, sufficient to remind you about what you were doing. This will help you identify any competency experience where you are deficient.
Maintain regular communication with your employer so you can discuss ways to tailor your experience to fill the gaps.  Your diary is an important document and may be requested by your APC assessment panel, so make sure you keep it up to date.
Tips for getting the right balance of APC experience on this week’s APC Helpful TipsUpdate www.mydelever.com

Guidance on APC competencies

In the first of a major new EG series providing guidance on APC competencies, Kate Taylor explores the three levels of inspection competency and discusses how candidates can demonstrate their ability to assessors at final assessment

Inspection is a core competency for many of the RICS Assessment of Professional Competence (“APC”) pathways. This is because inspection of property is a core – but often underestimated – skill for surveyors in a wide range of disciplines and assessors will want to test it rigorously.

In almost every surveyor function, from valuation to project management, accurate information gathering informs the inputs that the surveyor uses to make decisions and advise the client. Nothing happens in isolation and given that the assessors will take a holistic overview, experience, knowledge and skill in inspection are essential as a starting point for overall competence.

Level 1

All competencies are measured against specific descriptions articulated in the RICS APC Pathway Guides. To achieve level 1, candidates will need to know about different requirements for inspection and demonstrate an understanding of factors affecting the approach to inspection. In other words, knowledge of the information-gathering process that underpins competence.

At level 1, assessors will want to check that candidates have a good knowledge of key documents – particularly those produced by the RICS – and the law. For example, candidates should be familiar with the RICS guidance note Surveying Safely. Health and safety as a mandatory competency has significant crossover with inspection and assessors often take the opportunity to test two competencies at once, since they only have one hour to test around seven technical competencies (depending on the pathway) and 10 mandatory competencies.

A common pitfall is out-of-date level 1 knowledge of documents or the law, making it important for candidates not to rely on older editions of textbooks or university notes. For example, Surveying Safely was written in 2011, but has, to a certain extent, been overtaken by subsequent legislation, such as the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2012. It is imperative for candidates to stay up to date on health and safety by regularly looking at the HSE website.

A top tip is not to forget that, for most pathways, inspection knowledge at level 1 will include construction and defects. Whether a candidate has an understanding of how a property is built, how old it is and what may go wrong with it, is a good way for assessors to test the general property knowledge that forms part of the “surveyor sense”. Don’t underestimate the value of looking at construction sites for all classes of property or even watching programmes such as Grand Designs.

Level 2

Level 2 moves into the realm of practical application. At level 2, candidates need to demonstrate, with reference to specific examples, experience of undertaking inspections to gather information for various purposes. The information gathering will vary according to the purpose of the inspection and assessors will often test a candidate’s understanding of the context for the inspection. In other words: “why am I here?” and “what information do I need to collect?” This can include a discussion about the terms of engagement and level of service agreed with the client.

At level 2, inspection methodology is often questioned and can confuse candidates. A simple question such as “what did you do once you arrived at the property?” can cause panic and overthinking. What the assessor wants is the actual mechanics of the inspection described step by step in a logical fashion. A good way for candidates to do this is to describe the checklist used and reference RICS guidance, for example,HomeBuyer Report (4th edition) Practice Note Checklist. Candidates must remember to mention record keeping and note taking as a key part of the inspection.

A potential pitfall is not listening to the question and launching into a description of the due diligence carried out prior to inspection rather than the inspection itself.

A top tip is to focus on the inspection for the case study, as this inspection is likely to be probed more fully.

Level 3

Level 3 centres around providing reasoned advice to clients, adding value through skill and experience and making recommendations that enable clients to take decisions about property. This requires interpreting the information gathered and showing insight. Remember that in this context a client can be any stakeholder, ie, it could include the candidate’s team members.

The candidate must describe the format of the advice given, what the advice was, the reasons for that advice and what the client did with it. For example, the advice may have formed part of a written report, which suggested seeking specialist advice because something was observed that may have constituted contamination and the client acted on that advice by employing a chartered environmental surveyor to protect its interests. Contamination can be a good area of more complex reasoned advice. Candidates should ensure that they have read the RICS guidance note – Contamination, the Environment and Sustainability – use the appropriate language and don’t overstep their area of competence.

A potential pitfall is not taking responsibility. Candidates need to use “I” not “we” and be the surveyor responsible (under supervision) for giving that inspection advice to the client.

A top tip is to choose words carefully. Advice is the key word for level 3. Candidates should ensure that theyinclude it in responses to questions about examples of inspection experience.

Inspection is often the first competency tested in relation to the case study and a well-prepared candidate can create a good impression through confident and knowledgeable “surveyor sense”. Inspection competence will provide an impression of a “safe pair of hands” and feed into the holistic overview. Revising won’t be enough: candidates need to be articulate and confident about their experience to be able to demonstrate competence.

Underestimate inspection at your peril.

For DeLever information and updates. www.delever.com 


RICS APC candidates – Getting the right balance of experience

Getting the right balance of experience

As the APC is based on your competency experience it is hard to know whether you are on track if your diary and log book are not up to date. It is a good idea to write up your diary and log book  weekly, including a Trainingdetailed description regarding your experience.  We suggest writing a sentence or two for each diary entry, sufficient to remind you about what you were doing. This will help you identify any competency experience where you are deficient.

Maintain regular communication with your employer so you can discuss ways to tailor your experience to fill the gaps.  Your diary is an Mock Interviewimportant document and may be requested by your APC assessment panel, so make sure you keep it up to date.

MY APC Diary. Are you struggling to keep your logs up to date ?
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Understand the Levels

Understand the Levels

Unfortunately most the candidates I meet do not understand the competency levels:

Level 1 – This is all about LEARNING.  Do not try and define the competency or regurgitate the APC Pathway guide text, as so many candidates seem to do!  Remember you are trying to demonstrate to the assessors that you have reviewed the requirements in the APC Pathway guide with your supervisor and counsellor, and have researched, undertaken and achieved the required learning.   Also, remember not to talk about your project experience examples in this level, unless you wish to refer to the learning you have reinforced through your experience.

Level 2 – This is all about DOING.  This needs to be a focused description of the depth and breadth of your experience and one or two (if you can fit it into the word count) examples of your experience relevant to this competency.

Level 3 – This is all about ADVISING.  This needs to be a description of the depth and breadth of your experience and specifically where you have been advising clients, colleagues and anyone else of relevance.  Remember, the ability to advise effectively comes from having had a large amount of varied experience, relevant to your declared competencies.

Get the most out of your three monthly meetings

Get the most out of your three monthly meetings
Your supervisor and counsellor will play a vital role in your success at final assessment.  If they are engaged with you, really test your understanding and only sign off your competency experience when you are ready, this will really help you to be thoroughly prepared for the final assessment.
Get the most out of your three monthly meetings with your supervisor/counsellor
  1. Review your experience with your supervisor and counsellor weekly (daily is too frequent) and allocate the weekly project experience to the relevant days (or half days).
  2. Only allocate one competency reference per competency day (or half day).
  3. Book the three month meetings well in advance and ensure all parties are aware of the dates and are reminded to attend.
  4. One week before each three month meeting submit your completed (up to date) documentation and templates to your supervisor/counsellor for review prior to the meeting.
  5. Make sure you chair each three month meeting.
  6. Make sure you minute the meeting and record action points.
  7. At the beginning of each meeting give a your supervisor/counsellor half hour review of what you have achieved since the last meeting and the competency levels you would like to be considered for sign off.
  8. Your supervisor/counsellor will either sign off the relevant competency levels, or if they feel the level is not quite complete, defer the sign off to the next three month meeting.
  9. Write up the meeting minutes within 7 days of the meeting and confirm them as a correct record of events at the next meeting.
  10. Make sure that you monitor and manage the action points from the meeting.
Don’t forget the three month period is a timeframe suggested by RICS as a minimum period within which to formalise the process.  There is nothing stopping you meeting more regularly if you feel that is appropriate.
DON’T FORGET to keep your documentation up to date
Your meetings with your supervisor and counsellor will be meaningless if you don’t give them up to date documents to review.  It is hard to know whether you are on track if your diary and log book are not up to date. It is a good idea to write up your diary and log book weekly, including a detailed description regarding your experience.  We suggest writing a sentence or two for each diary entry, sufficient to remind you about what you were doing. This will help you identify any competency experience where you are deficient. Don’t forget to discuss ways to tailor your experience to fill the gaps with your supervisor and counsellor.  Your diary is an important document and may be requested by your APC assessment panel, so make sure you keep it up to date.